Archives for category: artitsts
Monster Bowling

Only 68 days until spring if I am counting correctly. We seem to be experiencing endless days trapped indoors escaping the bitter cold generously provided by Old Man Winter. Thanks mister.

Monsters to the rescue….

Our Monster Bowling will bring a warm fuzzy feeling to indoor play.

Monster Sandwiches

After working up an appetite from bowling, it’s time for Monster Sandwiches. Caroline at Chocolate and Carrots featured these frightfully delicious sandwiches at Halloween, but we are adding them to Monsters to the Rescue.

monster brownies

Miserably cold Minnesota winters must have some chocolate, and in the form of Monster Brownies today would be most fitting.

Monster clips

While in a monster mood, Mr. Printables has the 123 for making colorful  Monster Bites utilizing wooden clothes pins.

Monster Puppets at Totally Kids

If you haven’t gotten your fill of Monsters by now, why not try your hand at making your very own loveable one? (for 3 years and older)

Any other monstrously fun boredom buster ideas to share? Please send them on over,  we would love to include you in a post.

Birdseed House

This time of year we always like to think of our fine feathered friends living out in the cold.

Mary, at Home Is Where the Boat Is, inspired our plans for National Bird Day on Sunday, January 5th, 2020. Our bird neighbors will be getting this Gingerbread House built especially for them to celebrate the new year in style. Pop on over to her blog for the blueprints.

Mary is also the architect of bird cottages. Pop on over and get the plans including the edible glue, the essenntial ingredient for sturdy construction.

Bird Food

A few years back we surprised the birds with these easy to create treats. Join us Celebrate Celebrate with Your Fine Feathered Friends

Learn more about National Bird Day and what you can do to help!

Sock and Glove

Easy to make…easy to love!

If your house is anything like ours you probably have a “Department of Missing Socks”. Do not mourn the sad loss a mate. Look what you can do with some of your favorite mateless socks.

Sock Elephant

Step-by-step illustrations and instructions can be found in the Sock and Glove book by Miyako Kanamori.  There are thirteen delightful projects that are quick to make-and certain to amuse and delight.  You can have new menagerie, including monkeys, elephants, piglets, bunnies, and even an insouciant fish.

These whimsical creatures make perfect gifts and inspiring companions.

Sunday Cans

“Can” you imagine a Sunday filled with fun and exciting ideas for the entire family to do together?

Visit KugAlls for inspiration on making these Sunday cans full of great ideas and activities.

Sticks

Lorraine used Popsicle sticks and then Mod Podged the printed ideas on to them. For a complete tutorial with downloadable printable ideas hop on over to her blog.

Tin Can Telephone

Hello?… Anybody recall the tin can phone? Can you remember how they were made? They could make a comeback with instructions from education.com.

Can Cakes

“Can”t let the can ideas go without remembering can cakes. Oh Happy Day will teach you how easy it is to make these delightful little cakes from everyday tin cans.

Schools out, now what to do to keep your kids from falling into the frightening world of boredom? Go ahead and cast a spell on them and see what transpires.
Wizard
If you need some coaching in this area, Lisa, from Little Bird School of Stitchcraft can show you how to cast a spell on your kids (fingers) this summer. She has a super trick for keeping little hands entertained while learning an age-old craft at the same time.
Finger knitting is a great way of getting children interested in wool crafts, and it is very easy to learn.  It helps to improve a child’s dexterity and ability to concentrate.  No extra implements are required,  just fingers, the best tools in the world!
The finished product is a long thin strip of stocking stitch. In this tutorial, which is suitable for children, you will learn how to finger knit.  Any weight of yarn will work for finger knitting but for this tutorial chunky yarn was used which produces a nice stocking stitch.
To cast on, begin with the palm of your hand facing you with the tail end of the yarn between your thumb and index finger.  Weave the yarn over your index finger and behind the middle finger then over the ring finger.  Wrap the yarn around your smallest finger and weave back to your index finger:
Weave the yarn around the index finger again and continue in the same manner but above the first rows of stitches returning to your index finger again:
Try to keep the stitches fairly loose otherwise, it will be difficult for you to make the following moves.
The first row begins with the little finger, lift the bottom row of wrapped yarn up and over the tip of your finger (see below).  Ensure that you keep the top row of wrapped yarn on your finger as you go.
Continue the process of lifting the bottom row of stitches over the top row of stitches along your hand until you get back to your index finger:
For all subsequent rows, weave the yarn around the fingers again ending with the index finger. It should look like the image below:
Beginning with the little finger, lift the bottom row of yarn over the tips of your fingers.  Continue weaving and lifting the yarn over the fingers.  As you continue the process you will see a long strip of stocking stitch appearing behind your hand:
To cast off, do not weave the work around your fingers instead, lift the stitch off the little finger and pass it across to your ring finger:
Then lift the bottom stitch over the top stitch on your ring finger.  Continue to pass the stitches across and over until you get to the index finger with one stitch remaining.
Cut the yarn, lift the stitch off the index finger and pass the end of your yarn through the stitch and pull to secure the end:

Finger knitting is very addictive and children love it for its simplicity and ease.

For more crafty ideas, be sure to visit Lisa’s blog  Little Bird School of Stitchcraft.

Thanks again for sharing Lisa!

Learn how to make these super cute gumball necklaces for under a buck! Big chunky necklaces seem to be the “big” thing these days.  Gumball necklaces made for little girls are a fun rainy day craft. And, no one will ever believe they are gumballs!

Supplies for Gumball Necklace:

  • 6 large gumballs (can be found at the dollar store or party city)
  • 40 in. of ribbon (1/4 -1 in. size)
  • needle and thread
  • scrap fabric
  • doll needle
  • knitting needle


1. Pierce gumball with a needle. Then pierce another hole on the opposite side of the gumball. This is basically just making your mark.

2. You will use your knitting needle to push through the hole (only half way or it will crack). Then flip the gumball and push the needle through the other side. Make the hole large enough for the ribbon to fit through.

3. Thread your ribbon through a doll needle and push the needle through the hole in the gumball. Repeat with 5 of your gumballs.

4. Use fray check on the ends of the ribbon to stop the edges from fraying.

If you’d like to add a flower on your necklace follow these simple steps:

5. Cut (6) 2 in circles. Then you will fold the circles in half.

6. Fold your circle in half again, creating a pie shape.

7. Tie a knot on the end of your strings and thread the needle through the corner of the “pie”. Let’s call it a pumpkin pie. 😉

8. Thread all the circles on the string using step 7. You may need to turn the “pies” to create a full flower.

9. Stitch the bottom of the flower to the ribbon (or you could use hot glue… which, let’s be honest, is sometimes easier, and faster). lol

10. Tie a knot in the ribbon so your last gumball won’t be hidden under the flower.

11. Add another gumball and you’re done and ready to wear.

 

This amazing craft is one of many inspirational ones from Iheartnaptime.

A great “BIG” thank you to Jamielyn!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This Christmas there are few little people on our list who will be getting this weekend DIY project. Magnetic states is an idea from Natalme and looks oh so easy to create.

We have a couple of jigsaw puzzles of the United States that will be perfect to upcycle. Next step is attaching pieces of magnetic tape to each state. That’s it, back in the puzzle box and what fun they’ll have putting the states on their fridges.

The United States has a vast variety in the traditions, however, most come in the taste of the Christmas feast:

  • New England has Lumberjack Pie (a mashed potato crust, filled with meats, onion, and cinnamon.)
  • Pennsylvania Dutch serve Sand Tarts (thing, crisp sugar cookies)
  • North Carolina features Moravian Love-Feast Buns (faintly sweet bread of flour and mashed potatoes.)
  • Baltimore serves Sauerkraut with their Turkey (which includes apples, onions, and carrots.)
  • Virginia gives us oyster and ham pie.
  • Southern states have Hominy Grits Soufflé and Whiskey Cake (with one cup of 100-proof whiskey.)
  • Louisiana’s treat is Creole Gumbo. It can include ham, veal, chicken, shrimp, oysters, and crabmeat.
  • New Mexico has the Empanaditas–little beef pies with applesauce pine nuts and raisins.
  • Hawaii blesses us with Turkey Teriyaki marinated and cooked over an outdoor pit.   What is your favorite Christmas meal? Is it a traditional meal that you grew up with?

The term UpCycle is generally a reinvestment in the environment. In the simplest terms, UpCycling is the practice of taking something that is throwaway and repurposing it into something of greater utilization and intrinsic worth, in its second life.

White Dandelion Works introduced me to what yesterday’s sweater can become. Just look at the soft cashmere hats that are still a necessary wardrobe item here in Minnesota.

Happy  Birthday (day before) yesterday)  Dr. Seuss! White Dandelion Work’s soft hot pink and light pink striped elfin baby hat by was inspired by Dr. Seuss. Made from an upcycled felted sweater it is eco friendly. Cute, cute and it stands up on its own like a pixie’s.

Loneweever UpCycles sweaters into “re-originals” like this pin cushion or brooch cushion.

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Heather from Dollar Store Crafts felts sweaters to create stunning mittens. She has a picture tutorial so you too can give it a try.

 

 

Put your arms around this idea. The Green Kitchen knows how to turn sweater sleeves into little pants and has a step by step DIY.

Unravel a couple of your no longer favorite sweaters and send the yarn off with dimensions to Biscuit Scout and get a Fisherman style sweater custom knit for your chair. Yesterday’s sweater – do you have one to Upcycle?

Handprint Ornaments – Tomorrow’s Memories

Salt dough ornaments are so very easy to make.  Here is a perfect clay recipe for creating little hand impression ornaments giving you a head start on Christmas gifts. We like that it is non-toxic, made of food ingredients therefore safe for kids to play around with and squish, mush and squeeze the dough through their little fingers. It’s great for a quick economical, yet treasured gift for grandparents and other favorite relatives.  There may be a new tradition happening at your house too.

This clay recipe will harden when left out for a day or two and can then be painted and embellished if so desired. In humid climates, it may take several days to dry out. The drying time will depend on the humidity and how large your ornament is. To speed up the drying process, you can put it in the oven at 90 degrees for 30 minutes, then shut off the oven for it to cure. Remember to leave it inside the oven with the door closed.  You could also dry it completely in the oven for several hours.

Salt Dough “Recipe for Fun”:

  • 1/2 cup of table salt
  • 3/4 cup of flour
  • 2 tablespoons of mineral oil
  • 2 teaspoons of cream of tartar
  • 1/2 cup water

Mix all  ingredients together and knead it with your hands. If it is too wet, add a pinch more flour and if it is too dry add a bit of water. For a seasonal scent, add a small amount of cinnamon to the dough mixture.

This recipe yields a good snowball size ball. It is the perfect size for one keepsake hand print ornament. Flatten the ball out and press your little one’s hand into it. Pierce a hole with a drinking straw toward the top of the ornament for a festive ribbon that you will tie through once it has properly dried.

Kellie from This Blessed Nest made these hand prints with her twins.

If you’re not quite ready for Christmas preparations, then, let’s talk turkey.

Turkey Toes if you dare! Tickle the fancy of your Thanksgiving guests with these turkey toes aka what to do with leftover Halloween candy corn. This timely idea is provided by Laura Lee Lewis.

A great hostess gift!

Gobble Gobble!

dogs art at Totally Kids fun furniture and toys

Erin gone to the dogs at Totally Kids fun furiture and toys

Look, who has totally gone to the dogs!

Big Dog at Totally Kids fun furniture and toys

Jen received an art degree from the University of Wisconsin – Madison in 1995, with a concentration in painting and printmaking.  Her love of dogs continued with her dog walking business from 1995 to 2003, where most of the inspiration for her work came from.

Jen uses vibrant colors to reflect the emotion and joy that animals bring to our lives.  Her abstract palette and stylized forms capture their character and represent the connection that people feel with their pets.

Along with Jenn’s collection, she is able to create custom paintings for people and their pets.

Visit www.studiodogstar.com to learn more about Jenn’s work.

Minnesota’s Got Talent!  If you know of other local artists interested in displaying their work at Totally Kids fun furniture & toys, have them contact Josh, our marketing coordinator.  He can be reached at 952-881-2425.