Archives for category: dogs

Dog-gone Good Doggy Treats

We all may thinking bunnies this time of year, but do not forget your pooch.

If you have not made any homemade doggie treats yet, now is the time to do so.

These cute little Easter Egg cookies look yummy enough for the kiddos, but are specially cut out for doggies. The dog-gone good recipe is found below.

 Easter Treat Cookies (for dogs):

  • ½ cup Peanut Butter
  • 2 cups Whole Wheat Flour
  • 1 cup Steel Cut Oats
  • 1 cup Hot Chicken Broth
  • 2 Tbsp Olive Oil
  • 2 Tbsp Honey

Preheat oven to 350°.

Place steel cut oats in blender, food processor, or coffee grinder until they are almost at a powder/flour consistency.

Combine peanut butter, hot chicken broth, olive oil, and honey. Stir until dissolved.

Stir in ground oatmeal and flour until well combined. (I like to use my hands to make sure everything is completely mixed.)

Place dough on a powdered surface and roll out to a 1/4” thickness.

Cut out shapes with cookie cutters.

Place on a parchment lined cookie sheet and bake for 10 minutes.

Ice cookies if desired (instructions below), place back in oven for 2-3 minutes.

Icing Ingredients:

  • 4 Tbsp. Whole Wheat Flour
  • 2 Tbsp. Water
  • Food Coloring

Icing Directions:

Mix flour and water until smooth.

Divide “icing” into snack size sandwich bags.

Add 1-2 drops food coloring, massage bag until thoroughly mixed.

Squeeze all mixture to one corner of the bag.

For creating details like lines and polka dots-Snip of a tiny corner of bag and squeeze gently as you go, drawing on your cookies.

Or simply ice the entire top surface with a butter knife.

Thanks Pet Coupon Savings for this great doggy Easter treat.

 

trump-dog

This dog is leading in the polls – don’t believe it, just ask him.

Halloween Safety Tips For Dogs

1. Avoid chocolate and other candy.  Make sure to keep any candy that you are going to hand out safely hidden from your dog. Notify kids in the house to put their candy bags away. Chocolate is a big no-no for dogs as it contains theobromine, which their bodies cannot properly digest. The darker the chocolate, the worse it can be. Small amounts are typically not lethal, so if he does snag a bite don’t freak out. But also don’t let it happen.

Candy wrappers, tinfoil, and other dangers can be found in candy bags, so keep your dog safe by putting these away.

2. Put your dog in a safe place, either a separate room or his crate, when the trick-or-treaters are coming by. You should not let him be at the door to greet the kids. Costumes, commotion, and loud noises will stress him out and can cause problems ranging from stress to aggression.

3. Don’t leave your dog around kids without supervision. The erratic movements and loud, startling noises can really upset him. Add in a scary costume and you have a formula for disaster.

4. Be careful about placement of electrical cords for decorations. If your puppy or dog chews on these, trouble will follow. Arrange them for safety and use a bitter apple spray on the cord to keep pets at bay.

5. Don’t leave candles unattended. Carved pumpkins look great with a candle burning inside them, but they can be tipped over. They can also be investigated by curious pets which can lead to burns or worse.

6. Make sure that your dog’s costume is the right fit. Don’t put him in a costume that is too small or tight. Also check for loose ends that could be chewed on and swallowed or cause other problems. If your dog hates having the costume on be a friend to him and take the costume off.

7. Watch out when the door is open. If your dog is not secured in another room or in his crate then he might bolt out the door. With all the activity outside it may be even harder to get him back in.

8. Walk your dog before the festivities begin – all those costumes can be scary.

9. If the noise is bothering him, try adding background sounds (radio, TV) to distract him from the neighborhood hubbub.

10. Be careful when out walking your dog after Halloween – loose candy can be found and he may grab a big piece if he sees it before you do.

11. Think twice about taking him out with your family to trick or treat. There’s a lot of costumes and commotion which can put any dog on edge. He might be happier at home.

12. Tell kids the dangers of the treats and to not feed the dog any.

13. Be firm. Don’t let anybody who wants to greet your dog just to be polite. Be willing to say “no thanks” if your dog is feeling anxious or if the other person (perhaps an excited, sugar filled child) is approaching inappropriately.

14. If you take your dog with you, do not take him up to a stranger’s door – the resident dog may not take kindly to that and it could end up being a bummer. Someone should wait at the end of the driveway with the dog.

15. Do not leave your dog outside. There are plenty of rumors that dogs are taunted and teased, that gates are opened, and that candy is tossed in yards. It’s unlikely that lots of kids are running around causing harm to dogs on Halloween night, but the commotion is enough to unnerve your dog and it is conceivable that a youngster might toss a treat toward your dog with the best of intentions but bad results.

It may seem like a lot, but the truth is that Halloween is a fun time for parents and kids and can easily be fun for dogs too. Many dogs enjoy being the center of attention and will tolerate wearing a costume (which we get a huge kick out of!) to do so. Keep an eye out for the dangers of candy, keep your dog secure in your house, and be ready to ward off over excited kids and all will be well. Happy Halloween.

Thanksgiving Dog Treats

This was the year we were going to bake special Thanksgiving treats for Higgins the Totally Kids Shop Dog. Where does the time go? It is now Tuesday and the Thanksgiving countdown puts us on menu and food preparation planning for people. Another year passes and the special homemade dog treats for Higgins are back burnered once again.

Christmas! We WILL cook up special Christmas dog treats for Higgins.

Saved by NuttyMuttBakery.

Aren’t their turkey legs and pumpkin pie slices for pooches the cutest. Even if we had eecked out some time for our project, the results would never have been eye candy like those.

Turkey Dog treats

Mary, at Home is Where the Boat Is, wins the prize for her turkey treats wouldn’t you say? Her two furry friends, Chloe and Gracie are always treated royally and not forgotten at Thanksgiving. She has the recipe and pictorial for cooking up those pet pleasing turkey treats. Hop on over to her blog where you fill find loads of decorating inspiration as well as many how-tos for pups. You’ll be thankful that you did.

Have a Doggone Happy Thanksgiving!

Dog Days

This week’s Recipe for Fun features a dog in a dog. The idea is simple and is a fun cook together with young children. You simply bake a hot dog inside a dog shaped portion of dough.

If you’re kinda feeling the Dog Days of Summer, give this a try. Watch the instructions on video that walks you through the recipe.

Dog Biscuits

And…please do not forget your pooch.  Kids will have a grand time preparing these biscuits for their favorite dogs.  Gather round and watch this how to do it video put on by kids having fun at Highlights.

Woof, woof!  Higgins, the Totally Kids Shop Dog approved.

no dogs on this sofaAll you canines out there, tomorrow, June 21, is Take Your Dog to Work Day.  No dogs on this sofa, so jump up and enjoy a day at work with your people.

About 1.4 million owners take some 2.3 million dogs to work every day, according to an American Pet Products Association survey.

Higgins the shop dog at Totally Kids fun furniture and toysPerks of a shop dog!

Higgins, the shop dog, at Totally Kids fun furniture and toys works everyday.  Well, goes to work, but it’s debatable whether or not she works.  If lounging and thinking that she looks cute sitting a chair or under a desk is work, well then.

Tips from Cesar Milan:

Try introducing these steps for a calm and successful day at the office.

1. If possible, send out a simple “dog rules” memo to all your co-workers. The memo should address protocol for the day. Outline where dogs are allowed and where they are not, specify what to do in the case of a mess and rules for approaching a dog that’s new to the office, starting with “no touch, no talk, no eye contact.” Require all dogs to be spayed or neutered and up-to-date on all shots. Clearly define “off limits” areas of the office and be aware of colleagues that may be allergic to dogs.

2. Make sure you exercise your dog before you bring him or her to the office. You want to exhaust some of that pent-up morning energy before arriving at work.

3. Once you arrive, make a safe, cozy resting spot near you. This will keep your dog from acting territorial, and reduce separation anxiety.

4. Lead your dog around the office at the beginning of the day and let him smell his surroundings. This way you can introduce him in neutral territory.

5. If your dog’s stay is short, provide water but no food or treats. If your dog is staying for the entire day, you’ll have to provide food but make sure you exercise him before feeding.

                          Nick-Nack-Paddy-Wack Give Your Dog a Bone recipe below.

Home made Dog  treats

Easy-Peasy Peanut Butter Dog Treats (makes about 3 dozen)

This recipe and many other dog treats can be found at the Pet Guide.

You’ll need:

  • 2 cups whole wheat flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/3 cup smooth natural or organic peanut butter
  • 1 cup hot water or 1 cup skim milk
  • Optional: 1 egg

1. Preheat the oven to 375°F.

2. Mix together the flour and baking powder in a big bowl.

3. In a separate bowl, mix together the peanut butter and hot water until smooth. Slowly add the dry mixture and mix well. Add a little more water or milk if the dough is too dry, or flour if it’s too wet.

4. Place onto your counter and roll to 1/4″ thickness.

5. Cut with a bone shaped cookie cutter and place on a cookie sheet.

6. Bake for 20 minutes or until lightly brown. Let cool, and then let the begging begin!

“No Dogs on This Sofa” pillow is available at: CallyCo.

Totally Kids fun furniture & toys is proudly featuring the art of Studio Dog Star for the month of June.  Stop in and see the colorful paintings by local artist, Jenn Nicholson Paskus.

dogs art at Totally Kids fun furniture and toys

Erin gone to the dogs at Totally Kids fun furiture and toys

Look, our Erin has totally gone to the dogs!

Big Dog at Totally Kids fun furniture and toys

Jen received an art degree from the University of Wisconsin – Madison in 1995, with a concentration in painting and printmaking.  Her love of dogs continued with her dog walking business from 1995 to 2003, where most of the inspiration for her work came from.

Jen uses vibrant colors to reflect the emotion and joy that animals bring to our lives.  Her abstract palette and stylized forms capture their character and represent the connection that people feel with their pets.

Along with Jenn’s collection, she is able to create custom paintings for people and their pets.

Visit www.studiodogstar.com to learn more about Jenn’s work.

Minnesota’s Got Talent!  If you know of other local artists interested in displaying their work at Totally Kids fun furniture & toys, have them contact Kate, our marketing coordinator.  She can be reached at 952-881-2425 or kate@shoptotallykids.com.

 

 

An important message from Higgins the Totally Kids fun furniture & toys shop dog.

Halloween Safety Tips For Dogs

1. Avoid chocolate and other candy.  Make sure to keep any candy that you are going to hand out safely hidden from your dog. Notify kids in the house to put their candy bags away. Chocolate is a big no-no for dogs as it contains theobromine, which their bodies cannot properly digest. The darker the chocolate, the worse it can be. Small amounts are typically not lethal, so if he does snag a bite don’t freak out. But also don’t let it happen.

Candy wrappers, tinfoil, and other dangers can be found in candy bags, so keep your dog safe by putting these away.

2. Put your dog in a safe place, either a separate room or his crate, when the trick-or-treaters are coming by. You should not let him be at the door to greet the kids. Costumes, commotion, and loud noises will stress him out and can cause problems ranging from stress to aggression.

3. Don’t leave your dog around kids without supervision. The erratic movements and loud, startling noises can really upset him. Add in a scary costume and you have a formula for disaster.

4. Be careful about placement of electrical cords for decorations. If your puppy or dog chews on these, trouble will follow. Arrange them for safety and use a bitter apple spray on the cord to keep pets at bay.

5. Don’t leave candles unattended. Carved pumpkins look great with a candle burning inside them, but they can be tipped over. They can also be investigated by curious pets which can lead to burns or worse.

6. Make sure that your dog’s costume is the right fit. Don’t put him in a costume that is too small or tight. Also check for loose ends that could be chewed on and swallowed or cause other problems. If your dog hates having the costume on be a friend to him and take the costume off.

7. Watch out when the door is open. If your dog is not secured in another room or in his crate then he might bolt out the door. With all the activity outside it may be even harder to get him back in.

8. Walk your dog before the festivities begin – all those costumes can be scary.

9. If the noise is bothering him, try adding background sounds (radio, TV) to distract him from the neighborhood hubbub.

10. Be careful when out walking your dog after Halloween – loose candy can be found and he may grab a big piece if he sees it before you do.

11. Think twice about taking him out with your family to trick or treat. There’s a lot of costumes and commotion which can put any dog on edge. He might be happier at home.

12. Tell kids the dangers of the treats and to not feed the dog any.

13. Be firm. Don’t let anybody who wants to greet your dog just to be polite. Be willing to say “no thanks” if your dog is feeling anxious or if the other person (perhaps an excited, sugar filled child) is approaching inappropriately.

14. If you take your dog with you, do not take him up to a stranger’s door – the resident dog may not take kindly to that and it could end up being a bummer. Someone should wait at the end of the driveway with the dog.

15. Do not leave your dog outside. There are plenty of rumors that dogs are taunted and teased, that gates are opened, and that candy is tossed in yards. It’s unlikely that lots of kids are running around causing harm to dogs on Halloween night, but the commotion is enough to unnerve your dog and it is conceivable that a youngster might toss a treat toward your dog with the best of intentions but bad results.

It may seem like a lot, but the truth is that Halloween is a fun time for parents and kids and can easily be fun for dogs too. Many dogs enjoy being the center of attention and will tolerate wearing a costume (which we get a huge kick out of!) to do so. Keep an eye out for the dangers of candy, keep your dog secure in your house, and be ready to ward off over excited kids and all will be well. Happy Halloween.

___________________________

Halloween treats to make your pooch howl! Pop over to She Knows cause she really does know how to make these Pumpkin & Peanut Butter Dog Treats and will show you how to too.

___________________________

Halloween Treats For People

Pupcakes recipe from Gourmet Mom On the Go.

What first comes to mind when you think of Seattle? Did I hear you say rain? This week’s Science Saturday project is about water and is from Seattle.  Anne, a Seattle mother of three, shares her pictorial  How to: Self-Watering Seed Starter Pots.  Who better to know about water than a Seattlite, right? It’s still a little too early for starting seeds here in northern Minnesota, but I am anxious to give this ingenious method a try. Also with Earth Day around the corner, we’ll  add this to our list of ways to reuse plastic soda bottles.

A few weeks ago the girls and I did a project that I’ve been enjoying every day since.  We repurposed 2 liter bottles and turned them into self-watering planters for starting our tomatoes and cucumbers indoors.  They’ve been sitting on the window sill near my desk and I’ve been watching them grow every day.  It’s been the perfect antidote for the bummer weather we’ve been having here in Seattle.
I’ve tried starting seeds indoors several different ways over the years.  So far this is my favorite method because the soil is always exactly the right moisture level and it’s very easy to see with the naked eye when it’s time to add water to the planter.  There’s no guesswork involved and the plants seem to love it.
Here’s how we made them:
You need 2 liter bottles, potting soil, seeds, thick string or yarn (either cotton or poly seems to work), a Phillips screwdriver, hammer, and a sharp blade to cut the bottle.
Cut the bottle in half.
Use a Phillips screwdriver and a hammer to punch a hole in the center of the bottle cap.
Cut a length of yarn/string about 1′-1.5′ long, double it over and tie a loop on one end.
Thread the yarn/string through the hole in the bottle cap so that the knot is on the inside of the cap.  This will act as a wick, drawing water up from the basin below and into the soil.  The plant will take only what it needs, so the soil moisture will be perfectly regulated.
Put the cap back on the bottle top and nest the top of the bottle in the base. As the plants grow and use up the water, you can just lift off the top to add more to the base instead of pouring it over the soil.  As the soil dries, water will be sucked up through the string into the pot.
Label your bottle so that you remember what you planted.  🙂
Add potting soil and seeds…
Water….
You need to water the soil from the top the first time in order to make sure that it is uniformly wet and that the string also is wet.  Otherwise the surface tension of the water will prevent the whole thing from working correctly.
…and wait.

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Anne is also a talented soap maker with a fantastic line of artisan soaps at Seattle Sundries.
Here is her latest, and with a currently very dirty Shop Dog Higgins, must say greatest soap. But really,  you have to take a look at the packaging, each one is more clever than the other. The list goes round and round, like Bitchn’ Kitchen, Potty Mouth, Gender Neutral to Manly Man. You can even  private label soaps for wedding favors, corporate events, etc.
Thanks for all your inspiration Anne!
While I’m still thinking “water” and am inspired – better make it bath time for Higgins.

Or, does your dog look like you?

Contest: Do you or any of your friends resemble your dogs? Send over your photos to share and we will post them here to see if others agree with your perception. Send them to kayrocks@gmail.com.  A winner will be announced.

Higgins, our Shop Dog, goes to work at Totally Kids fun furniture & toys every day. Anyone brave enough to tell me who looks like Higgins? Or, or, or… anyone even braver to say out loud who acts like Higgins? (in the mother dog sense)

And NO, I do not drive an ATV like Higgins.

With all of our Easter Egg posts of late we must not forget our pooches. Pampered Paws Gifts offers these dog-gone special Easter treats for our favorite furry pals.

If you care to DIY it, Bullwinkle.com has a healthy Canine Cookie recipe that you could whip up in time for a Bunny delivery.

Classic Canine Cookies

4 cups whole wheat flour
1/4 cup cornmeal
1/4 cup cooked rice
1 egg
2 Tbsp. vegetable oil
Juice from a small orange
1 2/3 cup water


Mix all ingredients together well. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and knead.

On floured surface, roll out dough to 1/4 – 1/2-inch (1 cm) thickness. Cut into Easter Egg shape. Arrange on ungreased baking sheets; bake in centrer of 350°F (180°C) oven until dark brown and crisp, 40 to 50 minutes. Transfer to rack; let cool.

You are on your own rustling up a tasty yogurt frosting. It is out there somewhere and if you wouldn’t mind sharing it with us when you find one – that would be splendid!I

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And I could have been your president…..

__________________________

Halloween Safety Tips For Dogs

1. Avoid chocolate and other candy.  Make sure to keep any candy that you are going to hand out safely hidden from your dog. Notify kids in the house to put their candy bags away. Chocolate is a big no-no for dogs as it contains theobromine, which their bodies cannot properly digest. The darker the chocolate, the worse it can be. Small amounts are typically not lethal, so if he does snag a bite don’t freak out. But also don’t let it happen.

Candy wrappers, tinfoil, and other dangers can be found in candy bags, so keep your dog safe by putting these away.

2. Put your dog in a safe place, either a separate room or his crate, when the trick-or-treaters are coming by. You should not let him be at the door to greet the kids. Costumes, commotion, and loud noises will stress him out and can cause problems ranging from stress to aggression.

3. Don’t leave your dog around kids without supervision. The erratic movements and loud, startling noises can really upset him. Add in a scary costume and you have a formula for disaster.

4. Be careful about placement of electrical cords for decorations. If your puppy or dog chews on these, trouble will follow. Arrange them for safety and use a bitter apple spray on the cord to keep pets at bay.

5. Don’t leave candles unattended. Carved pumpkins look great with a candle burning inside them, but they can be tipped over. They can also be investigated by curious pets which can lead to burns or worse.

6. Make sure that your dog’s costume is the right fit. Don’t put him in a costume that is too small or tight. Also check for loose ends that could be chewed on and swallowed or cause other problems. If your dog hates having the costume on be a friend to him and take the costume off.

7. Watch out when the door is open. If your dog is not secured in another room or in his crate then he might bolt out the door. With all the activity outside it may be even harder to get him back in.

8. Walk your dog before the festivities begin – all those costumes can be scary.

9. If the noise is bothering him, try adding background sounds (radio, TV) to distract him from the neighborhood hubbub.

10. Be careful when out walking your dog after Halloween – loose candy can be found and he may grab a big piece if he sees it before you do.

11. Think twice about taking him out with your family to trick or treat. There’s a lot of costumes and commotion which can put any dog on edge. He might be happier at home.

12. Tell kids the dangers of the treats and to not feed the dog any.

13. Be firm. Don’t let anybody who wants to greet your dog just to be polite. Be willing to say “no thanks” if your dog is feeling anxious or if the other person (perhaps an excited, sugar filled child) is approaching inappropriately.

14. If you take your dog with you, do not take him up to a stranger’s door – the resident dog may not take kindly to that and it could end up being a bummer. Someone should wait at the end of the driveway with the dog.

15. Do not leave your dog outside. There are plenty of rumors that dogs are taunted and teased, that gates are opened, and that candy is tossed in yards. It’s unlikely that lots of kids are running around causing harm to dogs on Halloween night, but the commotion is enough to unnerve your dog and it is conceivable that a youngster might toss a treat toward your dog with the best of intentions but bad results.

It may seem like a lot, but the truth is that Halloween is a fun time for parents and kids and can easily be fun for dogs too. Many dogs enjoy being the center of attention and will tolerate wearing a costume (which we get a huge kick out of!) to do so. Keep an eye out for the dangers of candy, keep your dog secure in your house, and be ready to ward off over excited kids and all will be well. Happy Halloween.