Archives for category: homemade dog treats

Thanksgiving Dog Treats

This was the year we were going to bake special Thanksgiving treats for Higgins the Totally Kids Shop Dog. Where does the time go? It is now Tuesday and the Thanksgiving countdown puts us on menu and food preparation planning for people. Another year passes and the special homemade dog treats for Higgins are back burnered once again.

Christmas! We WILL cook up special Christmas dog treats for Higgins.

Saved by NuttyMuttBakery.

Aren’t their turkey legs and pumpkin pie slices for pooches the cutest. Even if we had eecked out some time for our project, the results would never have been eye candy like those.

Turkey Dog treats

Mary, at Home is Where the Boat Is, wins the prize for her turkey treats wouldn’t you say? Her two furry friends, Chloe and Gracie are always treated royally and not forgotten at Thanksgiving. She has the recipe and pictorial for cooking up those pet pleasing turkey treats. Hop on over to her blog where you fill find loads of decorating inspiration as well as many how-tos for pups. You’ll be thankful that you did.

Have a Doggone Happy Thanksgiving!

Dog Days

This week’s Recipe for Fun features a dog in a dog. The idea is simple and is a fun cook together with young children. You simply bake a hot dog inside a dog shaped portion of dough.

If you’re kinda feeling the Dog Days of Summer, give this a try. Watch the instructions on video that walks you through the recipe.

Dog Biscuits

And…please do not forget your pooch.  Kids will have a grand time preparing these biscuits for their favorite dogs.  Gather round and watch this how to do it video put on by kids having fun at Highlights.

Woof, woof!  Higgins, the Totally Kids Shop Dog approved.

An important message from Higgins the Totally Kids fun furniture & toys shop dog.

Halloween Safety Tips For Dogs

1. Avoid chocolate and other candy.  Make sure to keep any candy that you are going to hand out safely hidden from your dog. Notify kids in the house to put their candy bags away. Chocolate is a big no-no for dogs as it contains theobromine, which their bodies cannot properly digest. The darker the chocolate, the worse it can be. Small amounts are typically not lethal, so if he does snag a bite don’t freak out. But also don’t let it happen.

Candy wrappers, tinfoil, and other dangers can be found in candy bags, so keep your dog safe by putting these away.

2. Put your dog in a safe place, either a separate room or his crate, when the trick-or-treaters are coming by. You should not let him be at the door to greet the kids. Costumes, commotion, and loud noises will stress him out and can cause problems ranging from stress to aggression.

3. Don’t leave your dog around kids without supervision. The erratic movements and loud, startling noises can really upset him. Add in a scary costume and you have a formula for disaster.

4. Be careful about placement of electrical cords for decorations. If your puppy or dog chews on these, trouble will follow. Arrange them for safety and use a bitter apple spray on the cord to keep pets at bay.

5. Don’t leave candles unattended. Carved pumpkins look great with a candle burning inside them, but they can be tipped over. They can also be investigated by curious pets which can lead to burns or worse.

6. Make sure that your dog’s costume is the right fit. Don’t put him in a costume that is too small or tight. Also check for loose ends that could be chewed on and swallowed or cause other problems. If your dog hates having the costume on be a friend to him and take the costume off.

7. Watch out when the door is open. If your dog is not secured in another room or in his crate then he might bolt out the door. With all the activity outside it may be even harder to get him back in.

8. Walk your dog before the festivities begin – all those costumes can be scary.

9. If the noise is bothering him, try adding background sounds (radio, TV) to distract him from the neighborhood hubbub.

10. Be careful when out walking your dog after Halloween – loose candy can be found and he may grab a big piece if he sees it before you do.

11. Think twice about taking him out with your family to trick or treat. There’s a lot of costumes and commotion which can put any dog on edge. He might be happier at home.

12. Tell kids the dangers of the treats and to not feed the dog any.

13. Be firm. Don’t let anybody who wants to greet your dog just to be polite. Be willing to say “no thanks” if your dog is feeling anxious or if the other person (perhaps an excited, sugar filled child) is approaching inappropriately.

14. If you take your dog with you, do not take him up to a stranger’s door – the resident dog may not take kindly to that and it could end up being a bummer. Someone should wait at the end of the driveway with the dog.

15. Do not leave your dog outside. There are plenty of rumors that dogs are taunted and teased, that gates are opened, and that candy is tossed in yards. It’s unlikely that lots of kids are running around causing harm to dogs on Halloween night, but the commotion is enough to unnerve your dog and it is conceivable that a youngster might toss a treat toward your dog with the best of intentions but bad results.

It may seem like a lot, but the truth is that Halloween is a fun time for parents and kids and can easily be fun for dogs too. Many dogs enjoy being the center of attention and will tolerate wearing a costume (which we get a huge kick out of!) to do so. Keep an eye out for the dangers of candy, keep your dog secure in your house, and be ready to ward off over excited kids and all will be well. Happy Halloween.

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Halloween treats to make your pooch howl! Pop over to She Knows cause she really does know how to make these Pumpkin & Peanut Butter Dog Treats and will show you how to too.

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Halloween Treats For People

Pupcakes recipe from Gourmet Mom On the Go.

Rain, rain, go away, but while it pours stay dry inside and learn while you play.

We began this May with a drought, but now have broken the all time rainfall record for May in Minneapolis. The rain continues to fall.

Say Yes to Hoboken has a super idea and excellent pictorial for Rainy Day Marshmallow Building.

Your kids will learn the basic Engineering Design Process about load and balance with this week’s Science Saturday project.

So gather up some marshmallows and toothpicks – see what your little engineers can construct!

Thank you Liz at Say Yes to Hoboken for sharing your rainy day project. Question, how much of the building material disappears?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And I could have been your president…..

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Halloween Safety Tips For Dogs

1. Avoid chocolate and other candy.  Make sure to keep any candy that you are going to hand out safely hidden from your dog. Notify kids in the house to put their candy bags away. Chocolate is a big no-no for dogs as it contains theobromine, which their bodies cannot properly digest. The darker the chocolate, the worse it can be. Small amounts are typically not lethal, so if he does snag a bite don’t freak out. But also don’t let it happen.

Candy wrappers, tinfoil, and other dangers can be found in candy bags, so keep your dog safe by putting these away.

2. Put your dog in a safe place, either a separate room or his crate, when the trick-or-treaters are coming by. You should not let him be at the door to greet the kids. Costumes, commotion, and loud noises will stress him out and can cause problems ranging from stress to aggression.

3. Don’t leave your dog around kids without supervision. The erratic movements and loud, startling noises can really upset him. Add in a scary costume and you have a formula for disaster.

4. Be careful about placement of electrical cords for decorations. If your puppy or dog chews on these, trouble will follow. Arrange them for safety and use a bitter apple spray on the cord to keep pets at bay.

5. Don’t leave candles unattended. Carved pumpkins look great with a candle burning inside them, but they can be tipped over. They can also be investigated by curious pets which can lead to burns or worse.

6. Make sure that your dog’s costume is the right fit. Don’t put him in a costume that is too small or tight. Also check for loose ends that could be chewed on and swallowed or cause other problems. If your dog hates having the costume on be a friend to him and take the costume off.

7. Watch out when the door is open. If your dog is not secured in another room or in his crate then he might bolt out the door. With all the activity outside it may be even harder to get him back in.

8. Walk your dog before the festivities begin – all those costumes can be scary.

9. If the noise is bothering him, try adding background sounds (radio, TV) to distract him from the neighborhood hubbub.

10. Be careful when out walking your dog after Halloween – loose candy can be found and he may grab a big piece if he sees it before you do.

11. Think twice about taking him out with your family to trick or treat. There’s a lot of costumes and commotion which can put any dog on edge. He might be happier at home.

12. Tell kids the dangers of the treats and to not feed the dog any.

13. Be firm. Don’t let anybody who wants to greet your dog just to be polite. Be willing to say “no thanks” if your dog is feeling anxious or if the other person (perhaps an excited, sugar filled child) is approaching inappropriately.

14. If you take your dog with you, do not take him up to a stranger’s door – the resident dog may not take kindly to that and it could end up being a bummer. Someone should wait at the end of the driveway with the dog.

15. Do not leave your dog outside. There are plenty of rumors that dogs are taunted and teased, that gates are opened, and that candy is tossed in yards. It’s unlikely that lots of kids are running around causing harm to dogs on Halloween night, but the commotion is enough to unnerve your dog and it is conceivable that a youngster might toss a treat toward your dog with the best of intentions but bad results.

It may seem like a lot, but the truth is that Halloween is a fun time for parents and kids and can easily be fun for dogs too. Many dogs enjoy being the center of attention and will tolerate wearing a costume (which we get a huge kick out of!) to do so. Keep an eye out for the dangers of candy, keep your dog secure in your house, and be ready to ward off over excited kids and all will be well. Happy Halloween.

Panda beds may have even more meaning to Chinese families.

For years, the Giant Panda has been thought of by many Chinese as an unofficial national symbol.

Giant Pandas, said to have been around during the time of dinosaurs, are cited as a “national gem” of China. Prized for thousands of years by the Chinese, the Giant Panda is a symbol of peace. Once prolific in the lowland mountain ranges, the Giant Pandas have landed on the rare and endangered species lists due to a naturally low birth rate and a century of illegal hunting and habitat loss. Now protected by law, considerable worldwide efforts continue to help the large, cuddly bears survive as a species and conserve their natural habitat.

There are about 1,000 Giant Pandas thought to be living in the wild. About 239 pandas live in zoos and breeding centers, mostly in China and 27 living outside of China.

You can adopt a cuddly Panda.

Or do as some Chinese folks do; Panda paint your pups.

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Don’t forget your pooch on Valentine’s Day!

Whip up some heart shaped biscuits.

These treats are easy as can be to make, and can easily be cut into cute little heart shapes after the dough has been rolled out. Leave the baking pan of biscuits in the oven for several hours after turning it off, and then keep the biscuits out on the counter for a few more hours after that to make sure they’re completely dried out before putting them in a container.

Valentine’s Day Dog Biscuits

1 1/4 cups shredded Cheddar cheese
1/2 cup vegetable oil
1/4 cup beef broth
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup cornmeal
1/4 cup powdered milk

~ Preheat the oven to 300 degrees F (150 degrees C). Grease cookie sheets.

~ In a large bowl, stir together the cheese, oil, beef broth and garlic.

~ Combine the whole wheat flour, all purpose flour, cornmeal and powdered milk; stir into the cheese mixture until well blended. You may need to use your hand to properly blend the dough.

~ On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out to 1/4 inch thickness. Use a heart shaped cookie cutter to cut out the treats. Place them onto the prepared baking sheet 1 1/2 inches apart.

~ Bake for 20 to 25 minutes in the preheated oven, until the treats are firm and the bottoms are lightly browned. Cool on wire racks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whether a visitor or resident of Minnesota you will be reminded of familiar spots that you love. Oh, Minnesota – with your land, lakes and loons! This Good Night Minnesota board book is a fun look at what it is to be a Minnesotan. 20 full-color board pages.

Totally Kids staff pick. A huge customer favorite.

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A Taste of Minnesota Too!

Minnesota Tater Tot Hot Dish

Ten thousand lakes and one famous hot dish. You do not have to go to a restaurant specializing in Minnesota to experience it. A recipe so simple, many a young Minnesota girl practiced cooking it at a young age.

Begin with:

1/2 bag tater tots
1 lb. hamburger
Salt and pepper to taste
1 cream of mushroom soup
1 cream of celery soup

Brown hamburger in pan. Drain off fat. Mix hamburger, cream of mushroom soup, cream of celery soup, salt, and pepper in a casserole dish. Place tater tots on top of mixture. You should have the entire top covered. Place in oven at 350 degrees for 45 minutes. Serve hot. Makes a serving of 6.

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The Loon is the state bird even though some folks like to believe that it is the mosquito. Jello salad is considered by many a Minnesota state food. Sunshine  Jello Salad Mold  is another Minnesota classic.

Ingredients

  • 2 3-ounce packages lemon flavored gelatin
  • 2 cups boiling water
  • 1 cup ice water
  • 1 9-ounce cans crushed pineapple with juice (cannot use fresh pineapple)
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice or white vinegar
  • Pinch salt
  • 2 cups grated carrots

Method

1 Empty gelatin into a small mixing bowl. Stir in 2 cup of boiling water. Stir thoroughly until the gelatin has dissolved.

2 Stir in 1 cup ice water, one can of crushed pineapple with its juice, lemon juice (or vinegar), and a pinch of salt. (Make sure you use canned pineapple. Fresh pineapple has an enzyme that will prevent the gelatin from jelling.)

3 Chill in refrigerator until the gelatin starts to thicken. Then gently fold in the grated carrots until well mixed.

4 Add mixture to a jello mold. Set in the refrigerator until firm, several hours. To unmold, dip the bottom of the pan in hot water for about 5 seconds. Invert onto a serving platter, and shake firmly to release. Slice to serve.

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Devon’s Staff Picks:

My first pick for this holiday season is the Pets Eye View Camera. It is a small, lightweight digital camera that attaches to your pets collar. I cannot tell you how much fun it is to see what my dogs do when I am not at home! I was wondering which one of my dogs kept getting into the garbage, and low and behold it was the one I was SURE was innocent. Then the next day I attached it to my cat’s collar. It was hilarious to see the world through my cat’s eyes. I now understand why they run from my two 50lb dogs!

My next pick would be the Fun with Your Dog kit. It has a healthy cookie mixture to make treats for your dogs, with a dog bone shaped cookie cutter! It also has a ton of different experiments to do with your children. It is a really fun way to engage your children in science, without making it feel like “work”. (It’s also fun for the dogs too!)

Halloween Safety Tips For Dogs

1. Avoid chocolate and other candy.  Make sure to keep any candy that you are going to hand out safely hidden from your dog. Notify kids in the house to put their candy bags away. Chocolate is a big no-no for dogs as it contains theobromine, which their bodies cannot properly digest. The darker the chocolate, the worse it can be. Small amounts are typically not lethal, so if he does snag a bite don’t freak out. But also don’t let it happen.

Candy wrappers, tinfoil, and other dangers can be found in candy bags, so keep your dog safe by putting these away.

2. Put your dog in a safe place, either a separate room or his crate, when the trick-or-treaters are coming by. You should not let him be at the door to greet the kids. Costumes, commotion, and loud noises will stress him out and can cause problems ranging from stress to aggression.

3. Don’t leave your dog around kids without supervision. The erratic movements and loud, startling noises can really upset him. Add in a scary costume and you have a formula for disaster.

4. Be careful about placement of electrical cords for decorations. If your puppy or dog chews on these, trouble will follow. Arrange them for safety and use a bitter apple spray on the cord to keep pets at bay.

5. Don’t leave candles unattended. Carved pumpkins look great with a candle burning inside them, but they can be tipped over. They can also be investigated by curious pets which can lead to burns or worse.

6. Make sure that your dog’s costume is the right fit. Don’t put him in a costume that is too small or tight. Also check for loose ends that could be chewed on and swallowed or cause other problems. If your dog hates having the costume on be a friend to him and take the costume off.

7. Watch out when the door is open. If your dog is not secured in another room or in his crate then he might bolt out the door. With all the activity outside it may be even harder to get him back in.

8. Walk your dog before the festivities begin – all those costumes can be scary.

9. If the noise is bothering him, try adding background sounds (radio, TV) to distract him from the neighborhood hubbub.

10. Be careful when out walking your dog after Halloween – loose candy can be found and he may grab a big piece if he sees it before you do.

11. Think twice about taking him out with your family to trick or treat. There’s a lot of costumes and commotion which can put any dog on edge. He might be happier at home.

12. Tell kids the dangers of the treats and to not feed the dog any.

13. Be firm. Don’t let anybody who wants to greet your dog just to be polite. Be willing to say “no thanks” if your dog is feeling anxious or if the other person (perhaps an excited, sugar filled child) is approaching inappropriately.

14. If you take your dog with you, do not take him up to a stranger’s door – the resident dog may not take kindly to that and it could end up being a bummer. Someone should wait at the end of the driveway with the dog.

15. Do not leave your dog outside. There are plenty of rumors that dogs are taunted and teased, that gates are opened, and that candy is tossed in yards. It’s unlikely that lots of kids are running around causing harm to dogs on Halloween night, but the commotion is enough to unnerve your dog and it is conceivable that a youngster might toss a treat toward your dog with the best of intentions but bad results.

It may seem like a lot, but the truth is that Halloween is a fun time for parents and kids and can easily be fun for dogs too. Many dogs enjoy being the center of attention and will tolerate wearing a costume (which we get a huge kick out of!) to do so. Keep an eye out for the dangers of candy, keep your dog secure in your house, and be ready to ward off over excited kids and all will be well. Happy Halloween.

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Halloween Treats For People

                Pupcakes recipe from Gourmet Mom On the Go.

Enter the Canine Costume Contest!

Send in your best dog gone photo and you could  be the winner…. If there is a tale to go with the pic, all the better.

Bring your people down to the Wag-O-Ween Party     October 23

All Costumed Families with Their Costumed Pets will Receive a FREE $5.00 Gift Card!

(All pets must  be on leashes during the party please!)

Free Professional Photographer for Furry Family Fotos.

Hot Cider, Treats, Dog Biscuits, Games & Prizes for the Whole Family!

No Tail Wagging Pets? No Problem! Bring Your Favorite Stuffed Animal and Dress Up

5% of All Proceeds Donated to the MARS*
*Midwest Animal Rescue & Services

Do not let your people miss out on the fun. You can have them get more de-”tails” here.

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Halloween Treats for People.