Archives for posts with tag: revolution football helmet

Riddell Football Helmet Safety and Concussions.

This sign may bring a smile to a few faces, disappointment to others, but  its intention is to  call your attention to a very serious matter, read below:

U.S. Rep. Bill Pascrell  and U.S. Sen. Tom Udall marked Brain Injury Awareness Day last week by introducing bipartisan legislation aimed at protecting youth athletes from the dangers of sports-related traumatic brain injuries.

The Children’s Sports Athletic Equipment Safety Act would ensure that new and reconditioned football helmets for high school and younger players meet safety standards that address concussion risk and the needs of youth athletes. The bill also increases potential penalties for using false injury prevention claims to sell helmets and other sports equipment.

United States Senator Tom Udall requested that the Consumer Product Safety Commission and the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) investigate alleged deceptive practices of football helmet manufactures. In response to the “serious concerns” raised by Senator Udall, the FTC is now reportedly investigating the helmet manufacturers’ marketing claims. According to Senator Udall’s letter to the FTC, “there is actually very little scientific evidence to support the claim that Riddell’s Revolution helmets reduce the risk of concussion by 31 percent.”

If you have purchased a football helmet from the manufacturer Riddell or another manufacturer, they may have violated the law by allegedly falsely claiming its helmets possessed safety capabilities they did not have.

Anyone who purchased a football helmet under a belief that it possessed safety features that would reduce the risk of concussion, it may be important to talk to an attorney.

We are looking for folks who are interested in a guest posting of any experiences they would like to share on this topic.

If you would like additional information on this consumer protection case, we have a friend who could help you with this claim.

What kids wouldn’t find this to be the bed of their dreams?

Totally Kids fun furniture & toys is constantly searching for the most unique and creative bed options. We travel the world on that quest and pride ourselves in offering the best beds for you and your growing family.

Always at the top of our list is safety. Looking at this amazing bed, do you find anything that could be considered unsafe?

Here you see a perfect example of what at first glance might appear to be a dream bed, but in fact is a nightmare in the safety department.

 

 

The Sleep and Slide Bunk Beds are our newest fun yet safe introduction.  A place to sleep by night and an indoor playground during the day (minus the dangerous ropes and pulleys). Build of solid birch, it not only meets, but exceeds all safety standards. Since it is part of the add as you grow system, it takes your child creatively from first bed to college. Available in a warm Chestnut, painted white finish or natural birch as shown.

Over the years we have found hundreds fabulous beds that are available in other countries that fall short when safety is the main concern.

Let’s take a look at the most current regulations from the federal government.

Currently the Consumer Product Safety Commission requires the following as noted on their website:

Guardrails:
1. Bunk beds must have at least two upper bunk guardrails, with at least one rail on each side.
Lower bunks with mattress foundations that are 30 inches or less from the floor do not have to have guardrails.
2. The guardrail on the side of the bed next to a wall or on the side opposite to a ladder must run continuously from one end of the bed to the other. If the guardrail does not attach to an end of the bed, the gap between the end of the guardrail and the nearest end of the bunk bed cannot be greater than 0.22 inches.
3. A guardrail on the side of the bed away from the wall does not have to run continuously from end to end of the bed, but the distance between either end of the guardrail and the end of the bed nearest to it cannot be greater than 15 inches.
4. Guardrails must be attached to the bunk bed with fasteners that you have to release to take the rails off or they must require you to move them in two or more different directions, one after the other, to take them off.
5. The tops of the guardrails must be no less than 5 inches above the top of the mattress.
6. When you take the mattress off the upper bunk, any space between the bottom of the guardrail and the top of the mattress foundation must not let the wedge block described below pass through freely.

Bunk Bed Ends:
1. No opening in either end of the upper bunk that is above the mattress foundation can let the wedge block pass through freely.
2. When you use the thickest mattress and mattress foundation recommended by the manufacturer, the top of each end of the upper bunk must be at least 5 inches above the top of the mattress for at least half of the distance between the posts on each side of the end.
3. No opening in either end of the lower bunk below the mattress foundation of the upper bunk and above the mattress foundation of the lower bunk can permit the wedge block to pass through freely, unless the opening also allows a rigid 9 inch sphere to pass through it freely.
4. Any opening in either end of the lower bunk below the mattress foundation of the upper bunk that is tested with the wedge block must also be tested for the risk of neck entrapment if the opening lets the 9 inch sphere pass though freely.

These are the guidelines set up by the federal government to ensure the safety for bunk beds that we all need to be aware of.

SAFETY FIRST

Today another safety concern was called to our attention: Warning About Hand Sanitizer Poisoning in Children! Please read this article from Dagmar’s Momsense. If you have experienced a child’s ingesting hand sanitizer, we are looking for folks interested in doing a guest posting.