Today is  National Bird Day 2012! The study of birds has been a fashionable pastime ever since the Victorian Era, and the term “bird watching” first appeared as the title of a book in 1901. According to a 2009 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service survey, today, one in every five Americans is a birdwatcher. This is defined as anyone who has traveled for the primary purpose of observing birds or has closely observed and identified birds around the home.

Since the late 19th century, bird protection has become an increasingly important issue. Birds are among the most popular animals in the exotic pet trade, and most birds in captive breeding programs are kept there solely for commercial gain.

In an attempt to put an end to bird captivity, every year Born Free USA, the Animal Protection Institute, and the Avian Welfare Coalition team up in support of National Bird Day. Today, bird enthusiasts and activists around the United States are asked to take action on behalf of captive birds. Learn more about National Bird Day and what you can do to help!

In much of North America, winter can be a difficult time for birds. The days are short, and nights are often cold and long. The natural food supply has been consumed or is hidden by snow. Most insects are dead or dormant. Water can be hard to find, and food needed to provide the energy to keep birds warm might be scarce.

Befriend your neighborhood birds! 

Cook up a little food for your feathered friends –  Eighteen 25 has easy instructions for creating the seeded bird feeders shown above.

What You Will Need

  • 3/4 cup birdseed
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1 small envelope of Knox Gelatine
  • twine or string
  • cookie cutters, molds or mason jar lids
  • wax paper


  • mix together the envelope of gelatine with 1/4 cup of water and bring to a simmer while stirring. continue stirring until the gelatine is dissolved.
  • remove from heat and let cool for a minute.
  • stir in the 3/4 cup birdseed. adding a little more if there is liquid still in the bottom of the pan.
  • lay your cookie cutters out on wax paper and fill half way with the birdseed mixture.
  • cut your twine, knot the end and push the knot down into your birdseed.
  • continue filling with birdseed, covering the end of your twine and knot.
  • push the birdseed evenly into the cookie cutter until it’s full.